First gulf war essay

Babinski and I am the wife of Lyle S. Babinski who had served with the th Engineer Co. National Guard Unit in Waverly, Tennessee At the time his unit left, my husband was in excellent health and state of mind.

First gulf war essay

Nothing dominates the American landscape like corn. You can drive from central Pennsylvania all the way to western Nebraska, a trip of nearly 1, miles, and witness it in all its glory. No other American crop can match the sheer size of corn. So why do we, as a nation, grow so much corn?

The main reason is that corn is such a productive and versatile cropresponding to investments in research, breeding and promotion. It has incredibly high yields compared with most other U.

Plus, it can be turned into a staggering array of products. Corn can be used for food as corn flour, cornmeal, hominy, grits or sweet corn. It can be used as animal feed to help fatten our hogs, chickens and cattle.

And it can be turned into ethanolhigh-fructose corn syrup or even bio-based plastics. No wonder we grow so much of the stuff. But it is important to distinguish corn the crop from corn the system. As a crop, corn is highly productive, flexible and successful.

It has been a pillar of American agriculture for decades, and there is no doubt that it will be a crucial part of American agriculture in the future. However, many are beginning to question corn as a system: The current corn system is not a good thing for America for four major reasons.

The American corn system is inefficient at feeding people. Most people would agree that the primary goal of agriculture should be feeding people.

While other goals—especially producing income, creating jobs and fostering rural development—are critically important too, the ultimate success of any agricultural system should be measured in part by how well it delivers food to a growing population.

After all, feeding people is why agriculture exists in the first place. Much of the rest is exported. Only a tiny fraction of the national corn crop is directly used for food for Americans, much of that for high-fructose corn syrup.

Yes, the corn fed to animals does produce valuable food to people, mainly in the form of dairy and meat products, but only after suffering major losses of calories and protein along the way. For corn-fed animals, the efficiency of converting grain to meat and dairy calories ranges from roughly 3 percent to 40 percent, depending on the animal production system in question.

What this all means is that little of the corn crop actually ends up feeding American people. The average Iowa cornfield has the potential to deliver more than 15 million calories per acre each year enough to sustain 14 people per acre, with a 3, calorie-per-day diet, if we ate all of the corn ourselvesbut with the current allocation of corn to ethanol and animal production, we end up with an estimated 3 million calories of food per acre per year, mainly as dairy and meat products, enough to sustain only three people per acre.

That is lower than the average delivery of food calories from farms in Bangladesh, Egypt and Vietnam. In short, the corn crop is highly productive, but the corn system is aligned to feed cars and animals instead of feeding people. First and foremost, shifting corn away from biofuels would generate more food for the world, lower demand for grain, lessen commodity price pressures, and reduce the burden on consumers around the world.

Furthermore, eating less corn-fed meat, or shifting corn toward more efficient dairy, poultry, pork and grass-fed beef systems, would allow us to get more food from each bushel of corn.

And diversifying the Corn Belt into a wider mix of agricultural systems, including other crops and grass-fed animal operations, could produce substantially more food—and a more diverse and nutritious diet— than the current system. The corn system uses a large amount of natural resources.

And fertilizer use for corn is massive: The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest, and most iconic, example of this.

And the resources devoted to growing corn are increasing dramatically. Between andthe amount of cropland devoted to growing corn in America increased by more than 13 million acres, mainly in response to rising corn prices and the increasing demand for ethanol. Most of these new corn acres came from farms, including those that were growing wheat which lost 2.

That leaves us with a less diverse American agricultural landscape, with even more land devoted to corn monocultures. And according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, roughly 1.

Looking at these land, water, fertilizer and soil costs together, you could argue that the corn system uses more natural resources than any other agricultural system in America, while providing only modest benefits in food. Innovative farmers are exploring other methods for growing corn, including better conventional, organic, biotech and conservation farming methods that can dramatically reduce chemical inputs, water use, soil losses and impacts on wildlife.

We should encourage American farmers to continue these improvements.I: WAR [] We have heard our political leaders say from time to time that “War is necessary,” “War is a good thing.” They were trying to establish a major premise which would suggest the conclusion, “Therefore let us have a little war now,” or “It is wise, on general principles, to have a war .

First gulf war essay

The American Empire. By Wade Frazier. Revised July Purpose and Disclaimer. Timeline. Introduction. The New World Before “Discovery,” and the First Contacts.

Stephen J. Sniegoski is the author of many articles on political philosophy, World War II, communism, and the American war in Iraq.

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His essay "Neoconservatives, Israel, and 9/ The Origins of the U.S. War on Iraq" is included in the anthology Neoconned!initiativeblog.com holds his doctorate from the University of Maryland, where he studied American diplomatic history under Dr.

Wayne S. Cole, whose. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic writers. You can view samples of our professional work here..

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General Chuck Horner commanded the U.S. and allied air assets—the forces of a dozen nations—during Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and was responsible for the design and execution of one of the most devastating air campaigns in history.

A History of Freedom of Thought (), by Bury - philosophy from ancient Greece to the early 20th century Military and Non-Military Casualties in War. Deaths in Wars and Conflicts in the 20 th Century, by Leitenberg, Occasional Paper #29, Cornell University Peace Studies Program, Military Casualty Information, from the Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (DIOR), the "Source.

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